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  • 209.245.6177
  • info@andiswines.com
  • 11000 Shenandoah Rd.
    Plymouth, CA
    95669

Recent news, stories from the winemaker, happenings around the winery, recipes and more.

 

 

 

 

 

Shannon Landis
 
January 9, 2020 | Shannon Landis

Dungeness Crab Season is Finally Here!

Dungeness crab season is finally here and we're ready to celebrate with our annual White Wine Release and Crab Feed. As much as we love Dungeness crab at Andis we're also excited to celebrate the opening of our new event facility located next to the tasting room. The perfect venue to enjoy vineyard views in a contemporary setting while cracking into fresh crab.

Details about the crab feed, held on Saturday, February 15th may be found on our event page - /CrabFeed

For those unable to attend the winery event we've come up with an easy recipe for you to enjoy at home. A bottle of our slightly citrusy Semillon is the perfect accompaniment to this buttery, spicy dish.

The following recipe was adapted from Bon Appetite with the slight variation of using Meyer Lemons, a California favorite. CLICK HERE to see the original recipe.

Oven-Roasted Dungeness Crab Recipe

1/4 cup (1/2 stick) butter
1/4 cup olive oil
2 tablespoons minced garlic
1 tablespoon minced shallot
1 1/2 teaspoons dried crushed red pepper
1 large Dungeness crabs*, cooked, cleaned, and cracked (about 4 1/4 pounds)
2 tablespoons chopped fresh thyme, divided
2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, divided
1/4 cup Meyer lemon juice
1 teaspoon finely grated Meyer lemon zest

RECIPE PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 500°F. Melt butter with oil in heavy large ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in garlic, shallot, and dried crushed red pepper. Add crabs; sprinkle with salt and pepper. Sprinkle 1 tablespoon chopped thyme and 1 tablespoon chopped parsley over crabs. Stir to combine. Place skillet in oven and roast crabs until heated through, stirring once, about 12 minutes.

Using tongs, transfer crabs to platter. Add lemon juice and zest to same skillet; boil until sauce is reduced by about half, about 5 minutes. Spoon sauce over crabs. Sprinkle with remaining 1 tablespoon thyme and 1 tablespoon parsley and serve.

Wine Paring  - Andis 2017 Semillon, Bill Dillian Vineyard

Time Posted: Jan 9, 2020 at 2:55 PM
Rebecca Bozzo
 
March 1, 2019 | Rebecca Bozzo

California Welcomes Schioppettino (It only took 737 years)

But we’re glad it did!

Behind the Cellar Door is here again! And as a rare treat, we’re doing barrel samples of our limited production Schioppettino [skioppet’ti:no] I know it’s a tongue twister, but it’s delicious.

Schioppettino is from Northeastern Italy, near the Slovenian border.  Its known for its ruby color and traditionally makes light to medium bodied wines that are fruit forward, spicy and earthy. Meant to be consumed young like Beaujolais and some Barberas, this is an excellent food pairing wine.

Historically, it has been used in wedding ceremonies as far back as 1282 AD.  The name itself translates roughly to “gunshot” or “little crack.” The varietal almost died off in the Phylloxera outbreak in the early 1900s. At that time, many vintners decided to replant in favor of other popular varietals, which brings us to current time here in Amador County where Andis is one of a handful of wineries growing and making wine from the grape in California.

We welcome Schioppettino into our wine portfolio with open arms and we hope you do, too!

Cheers! See you at Behind the Cellar Door.

Rebecca and Team Andis!

Time Posted: Mar 1, 2019 at 6:00 PM
Shannon Landis
 
May 16, 2018 | Shannon Landis

Spanish Style Meatball Recipe

Who doesn’t love a great meatball, especially when paired with a good wine?! I’m not talking about a bag of frozen processed meatballs, I’m talking about savory little morsels you can customize with items from your spice drawer or herb garden.

 

Cooking at a winery means the perfect wine pairing is always at the forefront when developing recipes. This recipe uses Spanish smoked paprika to
impart depth and a handful of local fresh herbs to enhance the old world style of our wines. Andis Grenache is used to deglaze the pan, a grape commonly associated with Spain and an even better wine to drink alongside this dish.

 

The best thing about meatballs is how forgiving and versatile they are; you can switch out the protein, spices, herbs or sauce to reflect the season and to pair with different wine varietals. Try pairing lamb meatballs with Andis Mourvèdre or try pairing Andis Rosè with a cranberry turkey meatball. Be sure to grab a loaf of your favorite crusty bread to sop up the savory sauce.

 

Grenache is currently featured on our tasting menu at Andis Wines. Come visit the winery and buy a bottle for $25.99 or a case and receive a 10% discount. Join our wine club and save over $7 per bottle! For more information on the benefits of joining Club Andis visit /Club/Join-Club- Andis, or better yet, come into our tasting room and visit with one of our knowledgeable and friendly team members where you can try the meatballs and Grenache together firsthand!

 

Albondigas – Spanish Meatballs
(makes about 20 – 1 oz meatballs)
 1lb Lean Ground Beef
 ⅓ cup Plain Breadcrumbs
 1 Egg
 1 teaspoon Ground Cumin
 1/2 teaspoon Ground Coriander
 1 teaspoon Dried Oregano
 1/4 teaspoon Red Chili Flakes
 ¾ teaspoon Salt
 Freshly Ground Black Pepper

For the tomato sauce
 2 tablespoons Olive Oil
 one large Red Onion, diced
 1 -2 Garlic Cloves, minced
 1 teaspoon Ground Cumin
 A heaped teaspoon Smoked Paprika
 ⅓ cup Andis Zinfandel Wine
 1 x 400g Canned, Chopped Tomatoes
 1 x 400 Pureed Tomatoes
 2 teaspoons Brown Sugar
 3 Bay Leaves
 2 stems Fresh Oregano
 2 stems Fresh Thyme
 1 small stem Fresh Rosemary
 Salt and Pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:
1. Place all the ingredients for the meatballs in a large bowl and mix together until
well combined. Roll into evenly sized 1oz balls and rest in the fridge to firm up
for about half an hour. (Meatballs may be frozen at this point and used at a later
date)
2. Heat the olive oil in a large based pan. Brown the meatballs on all sides, shaking
skillet so meatballs roll to brown on all sides. Remove and set aside. In the same
pan, sauté the onions until soft and translucent. Add the garlic and cook for a
further 2 minutes. Add the spices and stir through. Deglaze with the wine.
Reduce down by half. Now add the tomatoes, sugar, bay leaves and oregano,
thyme and rosemary. Season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Return
the meatballs back into the pan and simmer on low heat for about 20 - 25
minutes until the meatballs are cooked through and the tomato sauce has
thickened.
Meatballs and sauce may also be transferred to a Crockpot to finish simmering
on low.
3. Remove herb stems and bay leaves. Spoon meatballs into serving bowls and serve
with crusty warm bread and butter.

Time Posted: May 16, 2018 at 2:45 PM
 
March 17, 2018 |

Winter Winemaking

What do winemakers do with themselves outside of harvest? I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked this question. The truth is that we keep busy with the different cycles of vineyard and cellar work. As soon as the last 2017 barrel is put down in the cellar after harvest, we start breaking out the 2016 wines to work on our blends. Both the Atelier Melka and Andis teams are very excited about the 2016 Zinfandels and Barberas that we will be bottling in April.

When I’m not crawling through stacks of barrels or working on blends, I’m walking through our Estate vineyard. A lot of exciting changes are happening this year. If you’ve visited the winery recently you would have noticed that the vines closest to the parking lot were removed. These were some of the original Zinfandel vines planted on their own roots in 1978. Unfortunately, nature had taken its course with these vines and they were starting to succumb to the pest Phylloxera. After years of declining yield, we decided to remove the vines to pave the way for something new. The team and I are very excited to be planting Cinsault (pronounced Sin-So). This varietal is prominently featured in red and rosè wines from Southern France’s Languedoc-Roussillon region.

For the few who were able to try our small lot bottling, you may be excited to hear that we will be expanding the Schioppettino (pronounced scope-a-tino) vines in our vineyard. In the coming weeks we will be grafting our Malbec block over to Schioppettino and Cabernet Sauvignon. 

The second most common question I’m asked in the tasting room this time of year is about the cold weather’s effect on the vines. In the last two weeks we’ve had freezing temperatures and even snow in Plymouth! However, this time of year the vines are dormant and totally unaffected by the cold, unlike the bundled up winemakers and vineyard managers. Luckily we finished pruning before the coldest weather hit.

In a few weeks we will start to see budbreak throughout the valley. Budbreak is when the vines wake up from their dormancy and begin to push little green shoots from their buds. This event will mark the beginning of the 2018 growing season.  To add to our excitement, 2018 will be the first year we are harvesting Sauvignon Blanc, Syrah, and Petite Sirah from our Estate vineyard. Stay tuned, more news to come!

Time Posted: Mar 17, 2018 at 12:01 PM
 
September 9, 2017 |

Heat Wave! Harvest 2017

If you asked us two weeks ago, we would have told you we’d be taking the long weekend off. I would have been relaxing by a lake with a refreshing bottle of chilled Andis Semillon. But sometimes Mother Nature has other plans for us. This latest heat wave sent many wineries into a picking frenzy. The field numbers that looked nice and stable not two days prior were starting to jump all over the place. The slow and easy trajectory of the vintage turned into a pipe dream. The staff and I ended up processing all of the 2017 Andis white and rosé grapes in just a four-day window. But surely coming out of a drought, after getting all that rain this winter, the vines must have kept their cool. Right? 
 
There is a saying that “stressed vines make great wines”. However, heat and water stress have very different effects on the grapes. Some varieties and vineyards handle the heat better than others. Older, dry farmed vines like those at Andis have extensive root systems that allow them to keep cool and ripen on their own schedule. They have spent years chasing water deep in the soil, as opposed to younger, irrigated vines that rely too much on the farmer for water. Regardless of age, heat pulls water from the grapes. This loss of water concentrates the sugars, flavor and acids.  For that reason my two interns and I ran around the Shenandoah Valley every few days  sampling each vineyard we source from to make sure we get our picks right. While that sounds like a lot of work, our diligence paid off.  The whites and rosé came in with beautiful acid profiles, stellar sugar levels and amazing flavor. 
 
Now that the worst of the heat is behind us we can take a moment to relax, but just a moment. The bulk of our reds are just around the corner from being picked. The first trickling of our Estate Zinfandel grapes, as well as Petit Sirah from around the area, have made their way into the winery. These two varieties don’t usually come in before some of our lighter grapes such as Grenache. But we always adapt to the situation and tell ourselves “when they’re ready, they’re ready.” The heat wave this year threw many of us for a loop. It forces us to think about things differently than we’re used to, to make the most out of what nature has given us. Not to say that this is a bad year (to the contrary, I think it will be excellent!), but it has so far been a year that has kept us on our toes. Making us work a little harder to process everything in a shorter window than we planned. But the long hot days and late nights will all be worth it when I have the chance to share my Andis debut with the tasters who stop by! 
 
Happy Harvest Everyone!

Eric Hildreth
Enologist
Time Posted: Sep 9, 2017 at 3:18 PM
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