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Recent news, stories from the winemaker, happenings around the winery, recipes and more!

Mark Fowler
 
April 23, 2021 | Mark Fowler

We've Hit Budbreak! 2021

It's that time of the year when I regularly start walking the vineyards. Our Estate vineyard has 19 blocks with 9 varietals. Inspecting the vineyard block by block, it is fascinating to see how each variety comes to life each year. This year, the vines started showing little hints of green a week or so ago with each block showing bud break at different times. Some varietals, like Grenache, are the first to bud out, but then takes its time developing. Others, like Sauvignon Blanc and Barbera, are middle of the pack but once they bud out, it is a sprint, and they are done quickly. Others, like Zinfandel, bud out later. On the Estate, we have 6 blocks of Zinfandel, and it's interesting to see the effects elevation and soil depth have on the vines. Six blocks of Zinfandel all budding out at different times!

I will continue to keep you posted on our Estate vineyard development throughout the year. We will also schedule tours so you can see for yourself what is going on in the vineyards.

-Mark Fowler, Winemaker

Time Posted: Apr 23, 2021 at 5:22 PM Permalink to We've Hit Budbreak! 2021 Permalink
Shannon Landis
 
April 22, 2021 | Shannon Landis

Ellen Clifford of Delectable.com Disrobes our Semillon

 

Delectable.com
Ellen Clifford

Old World vs. New World: Sémillon
 

A shadowy figure Sémillon cuts; DOES IT EVEN EXIST?! It’s a mysterious grape that knows how to blend in. And it sports disguise names—perhaps it is a spy! But reporting to whom?

No, Sémillon has an identity all its own that strikes me as a secret love child of Sauvignon Blanc and Chenin Blanc. It has that lanolin lick that gives it weight reminiscent of Chenin Blanc, and is likewise prone to botrytis, but can be herby and lemony and have striking acidity that calls to mind Sauvignon Blanc. Or is it just that it gets blended with Sauvignon Blanc, so we get confused? To add to the ball of confusion, given age, Sémillon gets those fun toasty and honeyed notes.

It has its idiosyncrasies, and yet it hides.

It takes cover behind the names Bordeaux and Sauternes . It masks itself in blends, botrytis, and oak…maybe Sémillon (also sometimes spelled without the accent over the e) WANTS to remain under the radar. Well, I’m blowing its cover. Sorry, Sémi, your time has come. Now take off your baggy wool sweater and strut your stuff.

 I’m so sorry, I don’t mean to objectify it; it’s just more people should seek it out. This is my opinion, but you’re welcome to borrow it.

 True, some of the most famed Sémillon-based wines are Sauternes, that lusciously sweet and ethereal nectar that gets its kick from noble rot. Those are another story. One I should write soon, probably.

 But today I am looking at the dry Sémillon-based wines of the world.

Sémillon is mysterious in roots as it is in personality. It is similar to Sauvignon Blanc genetically, but they don’t seem to have a parent-child relationship. Its origins may be in Bordeaux’s Left Bank, or even the Entre-Deux-Mer, but confoundingly enough, it might be named for local pronunciation of St-Émilion, despite the fact that Semillon isn’t really cultivated there. But that is just a rumor.

I confess I likely tasted some of these far earlier than they would show best—although I’ve been told that during the first few years, they can be be great, then shut down until they are maybe 7. At least this is the lore of Hunter Valley.

Speaking of, shower wine pick? I’m going with the Andis Old Vines. Old vines because I like a wine from a vine with experience if it's gonna see me naked.

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CALIFORNIA

2019 Andis Wines Bill Dillian Old Vine Semillon

Andis is a perennial favorite of mine. Out of undersung Amador they also make a Barbera that makes my heartstrings go pling. But I’ll stick with the Semillon review right now. This Semillon would be a daytime robe. It is comforting, with plush apples and honey notes and the body of silk but its medium weight silk you want to wrap yourself in. But the acidity is acute, so you can get some work done while wearing it. It’s actually a robe that can translate from work-from-home robe to home dance party when the day is over and you are ready for fun robe, as it ends with flowery notes that invite you to party.

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE ANDIS SEMILLON

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE

Time Posted: Apr 22, 2021 at 2:11 PM Permalink to Ellen Clifford of Delectable.com Disrobes our Semillon Permalink
Shannon Landis
 
March 22, 2021 | Shannon Landis

Beautiful Reviews from Jeb Dunnuck and James Suckling

We couldn't be more proud of our team and the delicious wines we've been creating. From the likes of Jeb Dunnuck and James Suckling to Sunset Magazine the word is out that Amador County and Andis WInes are producing wines that rival the likes of Napa and Sonoma vintners.

Check out our current selection here - SHOP ANDIS WINES

Time Posted: Mar 22, 2021 at 4:07 PM Permalink to Beautiful Reviews from Jeb Dunnuck and James Suckling Permalink
Janis Akuna
 
March 21, 2021 | Janis Akuna

Mustard in the Vineyards

Mustard Plants

It must be Spring! Just look at the bright yellow fields full of mustard blooms in the vineyard. While the weather may still seem winter-like, Mother Nature is telling us otherwise.

The Andis Vineyards have never looked so beautiful with the ground cover throughout. As mentioned in my previous blog, ground cover or cover crops can be beneficial in replacing nutrients. But what about mustard plants? While mustard plants do not return vine nutrients back to the soil, they do provide biofumigation, which suppresses various soil pathogens.

Typically mustard plants are used in vineyards to suppress nematodes, a microscopic worm that infects vine roots. Nematode infection will ultimately lead to low grape production and severe vine damage. Mustard plants produce a biofumigant called glucosinolate that deters damaging nematodes.

Later in Spring, the cover crops are turned giving beneficial mulch to the soils.

So come visit us at Andis Wines and enjoy the beautiful view of our yellow vineyards while you can!

Janis

Watch a short video of our wine maker, Mark Fowler discuss cover crops in the vineyard - COVER CROP VIDEO

Time Posted: Mar 21, 2021 at 10:21 AM Permalink to Mustard in the Vineyards Permalink
Janis Akuna
 
March 11, 2021 | Janis Akuna

Cover Crops in the Vineyard


As wine consumers, if we at all think about how the wine was made, we may think of grapes and grapevines and may even think of the farming aspect of growing grapes. While we mostly talk about the wine in our mouths, we should really give some thought to the farming.



Spring is barely here, yet we see growth in the vineyards. Not grapevine growth yet, but rather cover crops. Why do we need cover crops?

As children, we all heard of rotation farming. Some vegetations will add nutrients to the soil, some vegetations will take nutrients away. We can't rotate grape vines every year, which take nutrients away, but we can put in cover crops to add nutrients. What you see in the photo above are peas growing in between rows of our old Zinfandel vines. These peas will add nitrogen to the soils. It's a natural way to provide fertilizer to the vineyard. So now when you are having that wonderful glass of Andis Old Vine Zinfandel, you can be reassured that we have been sustainable in our farming methods. Enjoy!
 

Watch a short video of our wine maker, Mark Fowler discuss cover crops in the vineyard - COVER CROP VIDEO

Time Posted: Mar 11, 2021 at 12:00 PM Permalink to Cover Crops in the Vineyard Permalink

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